Friday, May 29, 2009

Our home... from behind...

Yep, a LONG time ago, this was all grass, through to the back of the garage. I made it go away. Ha. I am king of my domain.

I thought about "Yardbirds", but then I would have people looking for photos of Eric Clapton and band or Charlie Parker, the original "Yardbird!" So, here ya are, our little abode...from behind...


And this is the other side, the one the neighbors are confused by. "Where'd yer grass go?, Looks like ya got some weeds there, buddy." "I have more birds than you, nah-nah!" (I say that with my inside voice.)



The amount of birds we see everyday still amazes me. When we first moved in, nearly ten years ago, this place was your typical, sterile suburban yard. Lawn in the front. Lawn in the back. A couple of token, and very small, shrubs here and there. And a rusty swing set. BUT, we did have seven very large, old trees to give us shade and the birds a place to live too. We've since had to have three cut down due to wind and insect damage, but we've planted more small ones to replace them eventually, in fifty years or so.




I've removed most of the grass in the front and all of it from the back gardens. Doodles likes to watch me dig holes. Lots of wildflowers. Another reason for Dr. Bob, the chiropractor. We have plenty of native plants and shrubs, both low and high for the birds to play hide and seek in. "We" also put in two small ponds with waterfalls and fountains. I think I really hurt myself digging those holes. Happy, happy for the birds, frogs and everyone else though! It's fun to watch the birds, squirrels and chick-a-munks climb onto the frog fountain to get a drink. I also have three bird baths spread around, just in case the ponds are busy. Customer service is first and foremost here in LoopyLand!

Even the frogs like the frog. I'm not sure what's going on here...

If all that wasn't enough for these spoiled brats of nature, we have ten feeders, including Hummer, Oriole and peanuts to keep everyone satisfied. They even get suet in the winter.


Yesterday I watched another House Wren singing his brains out and building a nest in one of the houses on the garage. The Baltimore Oriole's have been hitting the jelly and orange feeder on a regular basis, but I can't see the nest. We're up to 65 species in the gardens including the ones in the photos here and sooo many more...Yellow-rumped Warbler, American Redstart, Warbling Vireo, Red-bellied, Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers...I could list them all...but I won't. You're welcome.


You may think this is a ground feeder for Chipmunks, squirrels and the like. Actually, it's a very clever feeder for the bird in the next photo!

This Red-tailed Hawk is a regular visitor in our little city lot. He appreciates the ground feeder...me too! The moles and chick-a-munks don't like him.

I've shown photos of 'Bob' the Cooper's Hawk before. This IS a bird feeder after all! He's had two Starlings, a Red-winged Blackbird, a few Mourning Doves among others in the past month or so, he ate House Sparrow today, I had chicken, tastes the same.


This American Crow has been coming all spring. I finally found out why the lid to the hopper is always laying in the tray, he likes to take it off, very carefully, to get the sunflower seed easier.



Eastern Towhees are regulars in the gardens. They seem to like what's left of the lawn, I guess I'll save that part for him.

While doing a little gardening a couple weeks ago, I spotted this Lincoln's Sparrow in the back along with an American Redstart.


This Northern Flicker used to nest in the huge Oak in our front yard. The tree was 113 years old when we had to have it removed. The butterfly garden is there now. The Flicker moved a few houses down and doesn't mind the commute to our feeders.


This Pine Siskin and a mate watched us eat pizza on the patio this past Saturday. Aren't they supposed to be in Canada now?


This is the bird we look forward to seeing every year! Even though he gives me the crazy eye, I love this Red-headed Woodpecker. We'll see the juveniles at the feeders before you know it!


The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds always arrive early in May and find the feeders right away. When the vines and flowers start to bloom, they have a regular smorgasbord!


We also have our yard registered as a certified wildlife habitat with the National Wildlife Federation and and the wildflower area registered with Monarch Watch. Our butterfly garden is going crazy this year! I'm not sure what we planted and what might be weeds...oh well...nature, gotta love it!